Please develop a research paper on past and current struggles of Native Hawaiian

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Please develop a research paper on past and current struggles of Native Hawaiians seeking environmental justice for environmental and social harm during the US colonial past and current military regime. Here is a summary of the conflict between Native Hawaiians and the US.
Conflict Summary: The central conflict between
indigenous Hawaiians and the military is over the control of land, an issue
which is intrinsically tied to the question of sovereignty and cultural
survival. The military expropriated and occupied the richest and most strategic
locations, including important religious sites, fishing, farming, hunting, and
gathering areas.
As a result, Hawai’i is one of the most densely militarized regions under
U.S. control, with the military controlling 205,925 acres, or roughly 5% of the
land. On O’ahu, the most densely populated island, the military controls 85,718
acres out of 382,148 acres, or 22.4% of all the land. Statewide, the combined
armed services have 21 installations, 26 housing complexes, 8 training areas,
and 19 miscellaneous bases and operating stations.
The largest percentage of the military’s land holdings are made up of
so-called “ceded lands.” In 1898, nearly 1.8 million acres of former
national and crown lands of the Kingdom of Hawai’i were illegally taken by the
United States. In 1959, when Hawai’i was admitted as a state, the military retained
control of approximately 180,000 acres of ceded lands, while the rest reverted
to the state. The law required surplus lands to be returned to the state after
World War II, but with the exception of Kaho’olawe and Barber’s Point, very
little has actually been returned. Today, the military controls approximately
112,173 acres of ceded land, representing 54% of its land holdings.
Militarization has also impacted Indigenous Hawaiians access to Hawaiian
Home Lands. The Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920 set aside 187,000 acres
for Native homesteading. A 1983 Federal-State Task Force concluded that 13,580
acres of Hawaiian Home Lands were improperly withdrawn through presidential
executive orders. Of these improperly transferred lands, 1,356 acres in Lualualei
were removed from the Hawaiian Home Lands inventory and turned over to the
Navy. In 1999, under a land swap agreement to settle the improper transfer, the
Department of Hawaiian Home Lands received 580 acres at Barber’s Point in
exchange for the land at Lualualei. Although the land at Barber’s Point was
supposedly more valuable than the Lualualei parcel, 770 acres were lost from
the Native land base through this deal between the state and federal
governments.
Here are some sources to consider:
Tuteur, N. M. (2021). Militarization, slow
violence, and the emerging threat of condemnation in Hawai ‘i. Journal of
Environmental Media, 2(1), 3-1.
Nation Under The Gun: Militarism and
Resistance in Hawai’i. (2000, March). Cultural Survival. Retrieved May 13,
2022, from https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/nation-under-gun-militarism-and-resistance-hawaii
Alvarez, C. H., Theis, N. G., & Shtob,
D. A. (2021). Military as an Institution and Militarization as a Process:
Theorizing the US Military and Environmental Justice. Environmental Justice,
14(6), 426-434.
Spencer, M. S., Fentress, T., Touch, A.,
& Hernandez, J. (2020). Environmental justice, Indigenous knowledge
systems, and native Hawaiians and other Pacific islanders. Human biology,
92(1), 45-57.
Reporter, G. S. (2022, January 4). The US
military is polluting Hawaii’s water supply – and denying it. The Guardian.
Retrieved May 13, 2022, from
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jan/04/the-us-military-is-polluting-hawaiis-water-supply-and-denying-it

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