Part I: Introduction – In the introduction of your paper you want to pique the r

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Part I: Introduction – In the introduction of your paper you want to pique the reader’s interest and explain why your research is important. In this first section you should address the following questions. What is the primary focus of your proposed research? What research has already been conducted on this topic? For this paper, you do not need to conduct any outside research. Your review of the existing literature will be based on the readings provided in Canvas.
Part II: Methods – This section should include the following subsections.
– Subjects (age range, gender, socioeconomic status, and race if relevant). Also, in this section you will want to include information on how the subjects would be recruited.
– Materials (Do you have a particular test in mind, or do you plan to design your own? Describe it here. Consider the type of questions, length of time to complete the questions, etc.)
– Procedures (Clearly explain how the study would be conducted. Please use step by step directions. Your reader cannot see what you are thinking.)
– Data Collection ( How would you collect and organize the data if you were to truly complete this study?)
Part III: Predicted Results – What do you expect given your hypothesis and background readings?
Previous
here are some rescources provided. Please work off those.
Ghetti, S. (2008). Rejection of False Memories in Childhood – A Meta Memory Account.
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Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17 (1), 16-20.
Gonsalves, B., Paller, K.A. (2002). Mistaken Memories: remembering events that never happened
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. Neuroscientist, 8 (5), 391-395.
Loftus, E.F. & Pickerell (1995). The formation of false memories. Psychiatric Annals, 25, 720-725.
Loftus, E.F. (2004). Memories of Things Unseen.
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Current Directions in Psychological Science, 13, 145-147.
Loftus, E.F. (2005). Planting misinformation in the human mind: a 30-year investigation of the malleability of memory
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. Learning and Memory, 12, (4), 361-366.
Schacter, D.L. (1997). False recognition and the brain
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. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 6, 65-70.
Readings for Malleable Memories

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