Objectives: The aims of this assignment are to (a) identify a specific food just

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Objectives: The aims of this assignment are to (a) identify a specific food justice challenge that communities around the country are currently facing (food deserts, health challenges connected to food insecurity, sustaining public school food programs, contradictions of SNAP funding, etc) and research some of the strategies local communities have taken to address those challenges; (b) locate and analyze both current journalism about this issue and peer-reviewed/data- based research that helps to explain the deeper history of that problem, and (c) synthesize 6 sources in a coherent and original argument about that issue. Your audience for this report will include your peers, other scholars who research food justice (such as Monica White, Eric Holt-Giménez, or Teresa Mares), but may also include professionals at community-based organizations committed to hunger mitigation (such as Lifeboat Boston), or policy makers trying to address new challenges to food security and food waste management that have been amplified during the pandemic.
Writing an effective and interesting argument essay will require you to build upon the skills you have developed in shorter assignments and the previous paper: you should be able to summarize briefly the basic content of each article or source, you will apply reading skills of critique and analysis to each author’s argument, identifying the key terms and concepts from each source that will allow you to find connections among those sources, and you will apply concepts from the theoretical models / infographics to develop your own thesis statement. You will carefully select brief quotations from each of those sources, integrate them clearly into your argument, offer proper parenthetical citation at the end of the sentence, and submit a References page formatted in APA Style.
Assignment: Write a 5–6 page (1400–1600 words) Argument Paper on the specific Research Focus you developed through the collaborative process of researching and sharing articles on your Team’s Research Archive page (you may also use research posted by students in other groups). You should develop your argument using six (6) articles, including these types of sources (note which ones are *required v. optional):
(a) popular print discourse: articles from major weekly or monthly magazine (Atlantic Monthly, Nation, The New Republic and others) or in-depth (~800+ words) articles from a major national newspaper (Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal); avoid shorter Op-Ed columns which are interesting but less helpful; focus on articles that have edited content. Note that it is ok to use a source that is not a traditional print source, but just check in with me about that. For example, articles or blog entries from edibleBOSTON are also suitable popular sources.
(b) academic peer-reviewed / data-based discourse (*at least 1 required): one major article (minimum of 3000 words or 8 pp.) from a peer-reviewed journal or a chapter from an academic book; use the research exercises posted previously on your Research Archive page to identify each article as peer-reviewed; these articles and chapters also have edited content.
(c) book chapter /course readings (*at least 1 required): review the chapters we have been reading during the past 4 weeks and choose at least one that provides you with concepts and background information that support your analysis (check those lists of key terms and concepts for guidance about which articles to use).
(d) professional/trade publication, advocacy organization, or government website (*optional): these formal sources should include clearly documented research sources (footnotes, many academic References at the end) and substantive information about your topic. Some are similar in length and content to academic or peer-reviewed sources; while these articles sometimes have edited content, others may focus more on translating advanced research for a more general reader or compiling many sources for reference.
Potential sources linked below:
Alviola, P. A., Nayga, R. M., & Thomsen, M. (2012). Food Deserts and Childhood Obesity. Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, 35(1), 106–124. https://doi.org/10.1093/aepp/pps035
Birch, L. L. (2009, April 13). Preventing childhood obesity: what works? International Journal of Obesity. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo200922?error=cookies_not_supported&code=7326b2c0-c932-417c-b5ed-0fc1ca09cc64
Flora, C. B., & Gillespie, A. H. (2009). Making Healthy Choices to Reduce Childhood Obesity: Community Capitals and Food and Fitness. Community Development, 40(2), 114–122. https://doi.org/10.1080/15575330903001430
A Longitudinal Study of Food Insecurity on Obesity in Preschool Children. (2012, December 1). ScienceDirect. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212267212015146
O’Connor, A. (2021, May 7). How Food Affects Mental Health. The New York Times. Retrieved June 1, 2021, from https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/06/well/eat/mental-health-food.html?searchResultPosition=10
Thomsen, M. R. (2016, January 1). The Effect of Food Deserts on the Body Mass Index of Elementary Schoolchildren. Wiley Online Library. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1093/ajae/aav039?saml_referrer

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