It needs to be between 5-7 minutes. ONE OF THE SOURCES MUST BE FROM THE NEW YORK

For This or a Similar Paper Click Here To Order Now

It needs to be between 5-7 minutes. ONE OF THE SOURCES MUST BE FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES
IBackground:
In today’s society, we see a plethora of social injustices and unjust policies and practices that impact numerous people throughout our nation, society, and the world as a whole. Civic advocacy is an activity by which individuals or groups try to influence decisions within political, economic, and social systems. For our course, I want you to think about how you can be an advocate in the interest of the public good. Think about public problems or social injustices that you or others have experienced. There are numerous contexts that benefit from civic advocacy activities such as the environment, religion, women, ethnic groups, public policy, politics, and so forth. This video presentation gives you an opportunity to advocate for social justice or improved public policies on a topic of your choice in the interest of the public good.
Purpose:
The purpose of this assignment is to demonstrate your critical thinking and problem-solving skills as an advocate in the interest of the public good as you prepare a persuasive message motivating your audience to a specific course of action regarding a social injustice or societal problem. This assignment meets the following learning outcomes for the course:
Develop the ability to speak competently, confidently, and ethically in public settings.
Demonstrate the ability to collect, analyze, and use information to shape and adapt messages for various audiences, purposes, and settings.
Develop and adapt messages and message strategies to the needs and expectations of multiple audiences.
Organize ideas and supporting examples in a coherent and captivating message.
Speak in an extemporaneous, conversational style using language, voice, and bodily action effectively and appropriately for public settings.
Demonstrate the ability to apply public speaking competencies to multiple audiences and settings.
Task:
You will research and prepare a civic advocacy video presentation that meets or exceeds the following guidelines.
Topic. Your presentation will identify and examine a need or problem, then present solutions to help eliminate or lessen the need or problem. Your topic should focus on a current event or issue. As such, at least one of your five sources must be from the New York Times.
Organization. Your presentation should integrate one of two organizational patterns: 1) The “why-because” pattern includes the reasons why policies should change or reasons why your audience should do something. For example, you might discuss the reasons that pay day lending establishments should be abolished or why the US should have stricter work mandates to reduce the poverty rate. Maybe there are reasons that we should be idle-free (see sample video presentation). The second pattern of organization is Monroe’s Motivated Sequence, a pattern for persuasion based on human thought processes (see information at bottom of page).
Support: This is a researched presentation and requires at least five credible sources, with at least one from the New York Times. All arguments and ideas presented should be thoroughly developed with various types of supporting material (examples, explanations, statistics, facts, testimony). Remember that when presenting material from outside sources you need to cite the sources orally prior to giving the information and incorporate your sources throughout the presentation as appropriate.
Use of Appeals. Audiences are persuaded by three different types of appeals, all of which will be used in your speech. They are listed below:
•Logos/Logical Appeals: Intended to appeal to the audience’s logic and reasoning abilities, logical appeal will include material such as factual support, statistics, quotes, examples etc. which have been documented in credible outside sources.
•Pathos/Emotional Appeals: Intended to appeal to various emotions (love, pity, compassion, hatred, etc). Using a story that plays upon these emotions is an example of an emotional appeal. Also, passionate delivery adds to pathos.
•Ethos/Personal Appeal: Appeals focusing on whether the audience believes you, whether they think you are interested in them and if you are involved in your topic. Ethos includes things like your own personal experience that shows your listeners that you have a personal commitment to the topic and that you are knowledgeable. Make sure to present controversial ideas and contrary opinions with respect.
Connection. We know in persuasion that your audience must be motivated and able to listen. Any attempt to persuade requires that you relate your topic directly to the audience. So, throughout your presentation you will want to point out to your viewers how and why they are involved, as well as why they should be concerned. Connection to the audience is a good way to build credibility because the more similarly the audience perceives the speaker, the more likely they are to be persuaded.
Delivery. A persuasive speech requires conviction and confidence if it is going to be effective. Your vocal variety, strong eye contact and use of gestures, posture and movement will be very important. Remember to rehearse your speech until you are confident. Avoid being overly dependent on your notes. Doing so will enhance your conversationality and the extemporaneous nature of your speech.
Mechanics. The time limit for this presentation is 6 minutes. That means your finished video can run for 5-7 minutes without penalty. If you are outside of the 5-7 minute window, your video presentation will experience penalties as outlined in the course syllabus. Also remember that you must be shown on camera for at least half the time but may use various software to help you complete the video. Unlike in-person speeches, you have the chance to edit your videos and polish them up before they are seen by others. Use this unique feature to your advantage, however, don’t stress too much over perfecting the production elements.
CRITERIA FOR SUCCESS:
Your speech will be successful if you meet the criteria outlined above. In addition, please reference the rubric that outlines each criterion for this presentation.
Monroes’ Motivated Sequence: An organization pattern for persuading audiences to act.
Monroe’s Motivated Sequence consists of five steps:
A. Attention. Gain the attention of your audience so they will listen to what you have to say. This is a good place to begin connecting your topic directly to the audience.
B. Need (Problem). Show or prove that a definite problem or need exists and how this need or problem is related to the audience. Use evidence that shows the severity of the situation.
C. Satisfaction (Solution). Once you have proven that a need or problem exists, present a detailed solution showing how the solution will solve the problem described in the need step.
D. Visualization. Intensify the desire of the audience to do something about the problem. Connecting with your viewers is a natural part of the visualization step. Help your viewers picture how conditions will be in the future based upon whether something is done about the problem. There are 3 possible approaches:
•Positive Method: An optimistic view of the future, based on the assumption that your proposal is carried out.
•Negative Method: A pessimistic view of the future picturing the dangers that will arise if something isn’t done about the problem.
•Contrast Method: A combination of the positive and negative methods, usually addressing the negative results first and ending with the optimistic view.
E. Action. Prompt viewers to take a specific action themselves to help solve the problem. Be very specific abut what you want them to do.

For This or a Similar Paper Click Here To Order Now