Introduction: Your introductory material should set up your topic for your audie

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Introduction:
Your introductory material should set up your topic for your audience. Briefly summarize your findings on the subject – If the sources disagree about the value of or perspective on the subject, point out the areas of disagreement. Your introduction should not meander around the point of your paper. Your thesis should come at the end of your introductory material. State your thesis in the form of a sentence. It should not be in the form of a question. Your thesis should be a brief statement, in your own words, that points out the major issues about this topic that you discovered in your research. If you can’t articulate in a sentence what your main point is, then you probably don’t have a good idea of what you will be writing about.
Your thesis should NOT be in the form of a list, either. It should be written just as we’ve done with the previous essays; however, this time, just cut the “reasons” and the “because”.
Body of Paper:
The body of your paper should provide supporting evidence to support your thesis, in a logical, fully developed manner. For each new topic which supports your overall argument, provide a claim which is, in effect, the thesis for that sub-topic. Your supporting sub-topics should address these issues: How will this knowledge advance science or technology or society – not in broad, abstract ways, but in concrete ways? What is the major impact of these findings? How will they affect people? What are the benefits to people? Are there any disadvantages? Etc.
A writer of a research paper should synthesize the information gained from sources and weave them into a well-ordered discourse, using the sources as evidence to support key points. A paper which is just a string of quotes shows that the author made no attempt to come to grips with the subject and is relying on the sources to speak for her or him.
Conclusion:
Your conclusion should make some “wrap up” statements about what you learned about your chosen topic and the possible impact of your findings on people and perhaps society in general. Also, address any issues that may still not be resolved for you. Don’t be reluctant to address any issues that aren’t easily resolved or have negative or ambiguous outcomes. I am looking for a conscientious, thoughtful look at some topic of your choosing, sharing of the major significance of this issue, and any unanswered questions, if any, you are still dealing with.
Length of Full Paper:
At least 1800 words (not including the work cited page).
Sources:
Use a minimum of 8 current sources – these all need to be credible. Do not look at blogs or YouTube videos, or anything that doesn’t come from bonafide experts. Scholarly journals are the way to go, however you can find good sources all over the internet as long as you check the source of all information for reliability. Is the Internet site sanctioned by a reputable institution or organization? Does the person you interview have credentials and experienced with your subject? Does he or she have a built-in bias you need to address in your paper? What biases of your own may you have to be aware of to produce a scholarly look at this subject? Use The CRAAP Test for all online sources. All sources in your research paper must also be listed in the proper format on the Work Cited page.
Use quotes judiciously. Use them only when paraphrasing will make the statement unclear or a kernel of an idea is so perfectly stated that trying to paraphrase in your own words will ruin the impact of the statement. I also don’t want to see an overabundance of block quotes. However, I do want to see any and all ideas that aren’t your own CITED.

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