In 4.1, Please respond to each of the 4 questions using the guidlines from the a

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In 4.1, Please respond to each of the 4 questions using the guidlines from the attached rubric. Please be kind withouot any criticism. Use at lease one reference in each response. You may use the same source.
No title page, running headers, page numbers please.
Please title 4.1 as followed
Title: MFCYF-550 Week 4 Assignment 4.1 DB Responses: Rhonda Shumpert
1. Mackenzie Neth
I feel one personal experience I have with this topic is children being interpreters for their families. I have seen this at conferences at schools where children have to go with their parents to interpret for them as they do not understand English. This is also common in other settings such as medical settings where the child knows English but the parents do not so they have to help them out.
Another way is when children bring home knowledge they have learned at school and teach it to their parents. Often those from other cultures do not know of the different holidays or events that occur in our culture. Children can be introduced to these during school and then go home to talk about it with their parents. This is teaching the parents about our culture.
Lastly, children can help their parents learn about cultural differences besides holidays and traditions. They can learn about the meaning of handshakes where in some countries it is not respectful. They also learn and can teach their parents about the meaning of eye contacts and other gestures that could mean one thing to their culture but means another thing to American culture.
2. Yolanda Potts-Powell
The American family has undergone a dramatic evolution and change among African Americans has been particularly rapid and acute. African Americans now marry later than any other major ethnic group, and while in earlier decades, nearly 95 percent of black women eventually married, today, 30 percent are expected to remain single. The African American divorce rate has increased five-fold over the last thirty years and is double the general population’s rate. According to The Decline in Marriage Among African Americans, a greater share of family responsibilities is being born by women, an increased vulnerability to poverty and violence, and an erosion of community ties(Tucker & Mitchell-Kernan 1995). According to editors M. Belinda Tucker and Claudia Mitchell-Kernan increased joblessness has robbed many black men of their economic viability, rendering them less desirable as mates and less inclined to take on the responsibility of marriage. Higher death rates resulting from disease, poor health care, violent crime, and ever-growing incarceration rates have further depleted the male population. Moreover, because cultures adapt and change, making assumptions about family dynamics is problematic; families in the United States today from all cultures display a variety of configurations. There is no longer any such thing as a “typical” family. One can, however, expect that families from more traditional cultures not acculturated in U.S. ways will tend to value familism and display family structures that are quite different from the middle-class European American family model.
3. Megan Hope
Children play a huge role in how a family acclimates to a new situation. For many families, a main reason that they will immigrate is to help their children have a better future. So, children then become a driving force for how the family changes and grows in the new culture. I’ve noticed that children tend to have more exposure to new customs and are more inclined to try new things than their parents. Therefore, they’re more likely to find ways to merge the two different cultures.
One important part of culture is language. Children are a driving force for parents learning a language. Typically, children are the first to learn the new language because their brain is still developing and they have more exposure to language. In my career, I’ve worked with several families where the parents only know one language, but the children know two. Since they have to communicate at school and in extracurricular activities, these children learn the language faster. Now, obviously this is only a difference or a driving force if the family moved from a country that didn’t already speak English.
Another way I’ve seen children be an active agent for change is through various customs, sucha s traditional clothing. As I mentioned in a previous post, I grew up in a fairly diverse community. I had several friends whose parents would wear traditional clothing, yet their children would go to school in jeans and a t-shirt. I found that this was because the children wanted to fit in and not be made fun of. I had one friend who was supposed to wear a hijab, but she’d take it off during the day since she was being made fun of and then put it back on before going home. Eventually, her parents found out and they were able to come up with a compromise, which was essentially a different hijab style, so that she could maintain and honor her heritage while still fitting in with the culture around her.
4. Nallely Hernandez
Children in diverse families help immigrant families adapt. An example of this in children is most common among first generation children by supporting and sustaining households. They often bridge schools and homes by helping parents navigate cultural life and education in the US.
In my current role we see a big divide between children and parents when it comes to technology. Especially first-generation immigrant families are not to familiar with how to navigate technology and it is often left up the children to teach the parents and place their own rules surrounding technology. There is a big cultural divide and families often struggle to find services of help surrounding technology, especially when they are unaware of the potential dangers on the internet.
I have commonly heard the idea of kids playing as active agents in social processes by the term parentification. Where children experience premature adulthood and prolonged adulthood. Which refers to expecting children to step up as caregivers in the household due to their parents’ financial struggles, mental health issues, martial problems, or availability (Adultification, 2019).
In 4.2 Please respond to each of the 4 questions using the guidlines from the attached rubric. Please be kind withouot any criticism. Use at lease one reference in each response. You may use the same source. Font CALIBRI LIGHT 11′ No title page or running headers or page numbers plese.
Title: MFCYF-550 Week 4 Assignment 4.2 DB Responses: Rhonda Shumpert
1. Mackenzie, Neth
It can be hard for mothers to find outside people to take care of and watch their children when they work. It can cost them time with their children which they really want and need. It can also be hard because at times the mother is living in a different country trying to make money. This money is then sent back to where the children are living and to the providers who are caring for the child.
It can change the traditional way of mothering in many ways. One way being when the mother is in a different country they cannot directly provide for their children. It can be both physically and emotionally exhausting for the mothers as they do not have access to their children. Mothers must depend on other family members to care for their children, and they do not have the traditional option of mothering.
It can also be hard when the mothers do not have family to help them with child rearing. The mothers then must depend on outside strangers or individuals from places they frequently visit to help them with their children. Even then it can be emotionally taxing on mothers as they still do not see their children often at times.
2. Megan Hope
I think an important thing to note on this topic is that there isn’t one correct way to raise a child or to be a mother. I’ve had several mom’s express what we call “mom guilt” in my profession. Mothers wonder if their child would still be developmentally behind if they didn’t have to work, had more time one-on-one with the child, or had more resources. To all of these mothers I respond something along the lines of “the most important thing is that your child is healthy and knows he/she is safe and loved.” Everything else that goes along with child rearing will change as situations and circumstances change. We always say “Mom guilt is not allowed in this process!”
For many families, the ideal child rearing and child care situation would be that at least one parent, stereotypically the mother, is able to stay home and tend to their children while the other parent financially provides for the family’s needs and wants. However, in today’s economy, more and more families are finding that to be an unattainable goal and both parents wind up working to financially provide for their family. When this happens, there is a question as to who should be with the children. There are multiple options, each with pros and cons, that can be considered based on the family’s circumstances. If the family lives close to extended family, then grandparents, aunts, uncles, or even cousins could tend to the children. Other families are able to find neighborhood friends who work part time and they can rotate who has each other’s kids on any given day. Still, some families are able to have one parent work from home and balance both roles. Other families utilize and pay for a daycare or nanny service to care for their children. Another option mentioned in the book, that I hadn’t thought of, was to have a family member move to another country to work and then send money back for the welfare of their children.
As I mentioned before, there’s not one correct way to raise a family and each of these options have pros and cons. One thing I’ve noticed in today’s society though is that everyone tends to think that their way is the best way. For instance, if their family is in a position to have a nanny, then they’ll look down on families who send their child to daycare. Or, if they’re in a position to have one parent stay home, then they’ll wonder why another mom might choose to work instead of staying home. The stigma of “correct mothering” penetrates our society. But, there’s not one correct way to mother. Personally, as I mentioned before, I believe the most important part of mothering is that the children know they’re safe and loved. If that’s happening, then everything else tends to fall into place eventually.
3. Yolanda Potts-Powell
Research shows working parents at all income levels are affected by fluctuating or non-standard work hours. High compensation fields like doctors, lawyers, investment bankers, and highly-paid sales jobs often come with grueling or unpredictable hours (Tuttle & Davidson, 2014).
However, highly-paid parents have the income needed to hire in-home care or pay to maintain a slot in a child care center even if they don’t use all of the days and hours they have purchased. Parents in these roles may have more control over their schedule than parents in low-income or hourly wage jobs or may at least have paid time off without concern about job protection.
Furthermore, when parents’ jobs are low quality, children’s well-being can suffer in terms of cognitive and academic development, behavior and socio-emotional development, and physical health. Families with such job schedules struggle with unstable home lives and routines. Parents engage less in activities with their children, such as book reading and health-promoting behaviors, and parents’ wellbeing and self-sufficiency are harmed as well(Watson & Swanberg, 2011).
In conclusion, access to affordable quality care that meets the needs of working parents with viable career pathways for low-income workers is key for child development and family wellbeing.
4. Latarsha McCray
Parenthood is a most demanding stage and solely built on personal responsibilities and roles to raise a child or children into useful members of society. At the infant stage, mothering is the most demanding and fulfilling role for any mother. Many societies orient women into nurturance while men are oriented toward independence. This becomes the basis of building gender roles in most societies, a factor that makes women to be seen as caregivers. In undertaking this role, women especially those in either formal or informal employment, find it difficult to strike a balance between childrearing and work, babysitting and studies, parenting, and general career progression and development (Cowan et al., 2019).
To begin with, the main challenge in securing and sustaining alternate childrearing arrangements is the loss of or inability to meet cultural norms, beliefs, and practices that are identical to a given ethnic group in the diverse American society. Even though feministic theories speak and stand for all women, there are clear roles and goals of childrearing specific to a minority group like African Americans and the Hispanics that are lost once the child is closely looked after by someone who is not the biological mother. Roles like being the first teacher of the child, the voice of the infant, since she can communicate and relate the fears and feelings of the child due to the strong bond between them, among others, are lost, the child grows with character traits that are foreign to his or her culture, different from the parent’s character and behaviour (Lan 2018).
In addition, it is difficult to secure quality babysitting services in many economies. The high rate of inflation has raised the cost of living. Families with low income cannot afford quality nursing personnel and places, making the mothers opt out of any employee to take care of the baby (Cowan et al., 2019). This has rendered women unemployed in many cases. The need for women to be proactive in economic contribution to the family has made most of them sacrifice their love and deny the child the necessary attention. The breastfeeding period is limited, and weaning starts, affecting the child’s health, especially immunity. This problem affects the child even beyond the teenager (Lan 2018).
In conclusion, the change in the traditional mothering roles has taken on a different appearance. It should be reflected in all societies since its effects go beyond the infant stage. It can lead to poor health of a child, slow language and motor skills development, malnutrition, and an increase in the mortality rate of infants. This is especially true among minority poor families.

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