Image description: An image entitled How to Write an Email to Your Instructor sh

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Image description: An image entitled How to Write an Email to Your Instructor shows a poorly written student email to their instructor. The email reads hey lol, when is your office hours? btw, where is you’re office? The margins contain the following handwritten negative feedback and corrections from the instructor: My name is not hey, yo, sup, or dude. Use a proper greeting! Before asking your question always consult: a) the syllabus, b) common sense, c) the syllabus. OMG, what are you, 14? Write full sentences! The internet has enough bandwidth. It only takes a second to spell check! Seriously, your time is not that important. Sign your name! This isn’t chat and we are not friends. It’s in the syllabus! AAAAHHH! How did you graduate from high school!
The fictional response above is mean-spirited and an exaggeration. However, there are certain expectations that faculty, employers, and co-workers have of academic/professional email communication. This week, we’ll be discussing academic and workplace email communication. When you send poorly written emails (or worse: make ridiculous requests), I want to let you know that it IS noticed. Review the collection of poor workplace communications in BWS Ch 8.
Now, I want to hear your thoughtful reflections–some venting is okay–but you should also connect your response to this week’s chapter on netiquette, tone, and audience. Consider one or more of the following: What are the lessons learned? About school emails? Workplace emails and/or memos? Privacy of such communications? Other thoughts?

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