I need my paper rewritten. Critical Conversation essay Standardized testing can

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Critical Conversation essay
Standardized testing can have an effect on students and teachers, but why does standardized testing have this effect? The psychological well-being of teachers, families, and students is adversely affected by standardized testing. Standardized testing creates anxiety among teachers because they feel responsible for the performance of their students, leading to deteriorated mental health.
The standard test provides a guide to assessing a student’s ability. It provides a basis for assessing the strength and weakness of an individual student. By administering the standardized test to large numbers of students in a large classroom, a study can reveal the distribution of an individual student’s ability. A student should not be looked at based on a test score. A student should be viewed on how well they perform in the classroom. For instance, the star test in the state of Texas shows whether a student has mastered specific knowledge on a subject for a certain grade level meaning that if a student failed on the test it shows that they are not prepared for the next grade level meanwhile they are advanced on school activities, performances, homework. For some kids they do better on tests than in the classroom, where in this case standardized testing would be good for them.
Since the mid-1800s, standardized testing has been used in the United States. Several changes have been made to school curriculum across the nation over time as a result of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, signed by President George W. Bush. This specific topic is affecting students’ abilities to learn, from “Trosclair, Alice The Educators Room,”. “One Standardized Test, Many Different Student Stories.” May 2016, . Standardized testing only measures where a student is now, but not how far they have come. Many students tend to understand the concept of the things that are being taught to them in class, but are terrible test takers when it comes to taking standardized tests. From a viewer’s perspective, it seems illegal because of the way it’s affecting our students’ mental health. From the article, “A Population-Based Study of Grade 12 Academic Performance in Adolescents With Childhood-Onset Chronic Rheumatic Diseases.” by Lim, Lilly, “Standardization of a test is nowadays more widely discussed, although the existence of norms is the distinguishing characteristic of a standardized test that facilitates the interpretation of its results. Taking this approach requires more thinking, planning, accurate preparation, scoring, analysis, and refinement”.
How does the No Child Left Behind Act work? From the Standardized testing affecting a students ability to learn Assist. Prof. Kate Menken. English Learners Left Behind : Standardized Testing As Language .“It is mandated standardized testing in all 50 states. During the period 2002-2015, the United States had one main general education law, called No Child Left Behind” (NCLB). “School accountability laws held them accountable for how kids learned and achieved. The laws caused controversy because they penalized schools that didn’t show improvement. The NCLB has placed a greater emphasis on the educational achievement of low-achieving students, and enhanced efforts are being made to improve schools with persistently low achievement. The No Child Left Behind Act is also controversial because it only applies to public schools. Only homeschooling is an option for children, and private and religious schools are exempt”.
From the article, National Education Association. “History of Standardized Testing in the United States | NEA.”, 25 June 2020, Students with mental illnesses can also be accommodated and supported in the classroom in many ways. Even students who don’t have any type of problems should get the same attention. Allowing for breaks, creating flexible deadlines, setting up group discussions, and permitting students to redo their work are just a few of the many ways educators and schools can assist their students. The rising number of mental health issues requires school administrators and teachers to be aware of mental illness warning signs , so they can establish a support plan to assist students and families. Although educators are not certified psychologists, they must recognize the signs of mental illness. Teachers who spend the most time with their students bear a responsibility for their mental well-being. Being aware of the warning signs, keeping the discussion open, and supporting students as they go through this process are always teachers that can ensure that their students will thrive in the future to navigate their mental health are all ways schools and educators can support students with mental health needs. All of these are ways in which schools and educators can provide support to students with mental health issues. The majority of suicide victims are in school, due to the stress school presents and to standardized tests.
From the article Connection Is Key to Good Adolescent Mental Health, “It is important for teachers to be able to get a better understanding of how their students are doing in class, so that they can not only make a stronger connection with them, but also uncover the behaviors and participation efforts of their students. In addition to this, checking in as a class may allow students to feel less alone. Once they see that their classmates are not all perfect and great, they may feel relief, and hopefully will seek any necessary support. Check-ins generally contribute to a more positive classroom climate in which teachers are more aware of their students’ individual circumstances and students are able to break down the stigma around feeling “not good” at times”. This relates to testing because it’s important for teachers to know what their students are going through in order to teach them.
According to Parents Across America, “Overtesting may harm our most vulnerable children. Child mental health professionals have called the misuse and overuse of standardized tests “child abuse.” (Anchor) There is a 266 percent difference between how much time urban high school students spend taking standardized tests and suburban high school students. Todays students lives are at stake from their mental health Many of the health and behavioral risks associated with mental health problems among youth overlap with other risks like increased drug use, violence, and riskier sexual behaviors that contribute to HIV, STDs, and unintended pregnancies. In order for youth to be successful in their adult years, it is very important to help them develop good mental health. After all, our children are our future. As a matter of principle, US standards aimed at improving education quality are a good idea – one cannot argue with the fact that education quality is important. However, the problem originates when it comes to measuring the effectiveness of the standards. The same test is taken by all students with the same answers, and the results are supposed to show how well each school adheres to the standards and if those standards meet their intended purpose.
Standardized testing has become increasingly important in the classroom, resulting in educators feeling controlled less and less. This adds a great deal of stress to educators. Their own careers, salaries, and livelihoods may be determined by the performance of their students. In some cases, a teacher’s career, salary, or livelihood may be determined by how well their students perform on a single test, one day a year, at a single time. Students who are taught the test are taught only material they will be tested on; extra information not essential to high scores is omitted. From the article, National Education Association. “History of Standardized Testing in the United States | NEA.” Www.nea.org, 25 June 2020, Studies have indicated that educators are under pressure to improve their students’ test scores, which can neglect important lessons. Teachers are giving students worksheets with questions formatted exactly like standardized tests, instead of long term projects, physical chapter books, higher order problems, etc.
From the article,by The Anchor, The stress behind the test: How standardized testing affects mental health. “Students think that once they get into college that the stress will decrease but that is not the case. That is when the stress multiplies, due to exams and daily work in several different classes. For admission to public colleges and universities, state-wide exams may be required in some states”. In a way it is another form of a standardized test. In college the majority of students live away from home which can be hard with being away from their loved ones. “This can make the stress a lot harder when it comes time to take the exams they have. College students also try to live the college experience and it can be hard to keep a social life and keep up with your studies. Elementary students suffer the most because the stress can affect them for the rest of their lives and many more years to come. This is being stated because standardized testing can affect a students ability to pass into the next grade which can affect them being able to start college and get through the college process”.
In conclusion, Since the mindset is that college student’s grades matter more than their mental health, when it comes to exams and daily assignments. Even elementary through high school students’ grades have become more important than their wellbeing, standardized testing has caused mental health problems. However, standardized testing may have some merit, but at what cost? If you are a teacher, remind students of the bigger picture when they enter an examination. My advice to any student who is stressed out about an upcoming exam would be to study hard. Study with flashcards. However you study, remember that your future success does not depend on the grade you get on today’s exam. Maybe schools should leave high-stakes testing to the private sector and instead focus on educating kids, preparing them for adult life, and rewarding them for their efforts, rather than giving them high-stakes tests? Students do not learn from curriculum designed to test them. One way to solve the problem is not to count the tests, but then a new problem arises: can we rely on kids to take the tests seriously if they don’t count?
Sources:
An Annotated Bibliography :Standardized testing affecting a students ability to learn
Assist. Prof. Kate Menken. English Learners Left Behind : Standardized Testing As Language Policy. Multilingual Matters; 2008. Accessed February 15, 2022. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=sso&db=e000xna&AN=222241&site=ehost-live&scope=site
‘18, A. C. (n.d.). The stress behind the test: How standardized testing affects mental health. The Anchor. Retrieved February 15, 2022, from https://mhsanchor.org/opinion/2017/05/22/the-stress-behind-the-test-how-standardized-testing-affects-mental-health/
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Connection Is Key to Good Adolescent Mental Health | Adolescent and School Health | CDC.” Www.cdc.gov, 26 Oct. 2020, www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/mental-health/index.htm.
January 26, 2022 By HPSH Plaid Line Leave a Comment, et al. “How Standardized Testing Affects Mental Health.” The Plaid Line, 28 Oct. 2021, https://hpshplaidline.org/2021/10/28/how-standardized-testing-affects-mental-health/.
Lim, Lily S., et al. “A Population-Based Study of Grade 12 Academic Performance in Adolescents With Childhood-Onset Chronic Rheumatic Diseases.” Journal of Rheumatology, 2021, p. jrheum.201514., https://doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.201514. Accessed 15 Feb. 2022.
National Education Association. “History of Standardized Testing in the United States | NEA.” Www.nea.org, 25 June 2020, www.nea.org/professional-excellence/student-engagement/tools-tips/history-standardized-testing-united-states.
O’Connor, Meredith, et al. “Positive Mental Health and Academic Achievement in Elementary School : New Evidence From a Matching Analysis.” Educational Researcher, vol. 48, no. 4, 2019, pp. 205–216., https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X19848724. Accessed 15 Feb. 2022.
“Stake Holders.” Standardized Testing, standardizedtestingoverview.weebly.com/stake-holders.html. Accessed 25 Feb. 2022.
Trosclair, Alice. “One Standardized Test, Many Different Student Stories.” The Educators Room, 17 May 2016, theeducatorsroom.com/one-standardized-test-many-different-student-stories/.

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