First Paper – 1200 words or about 4-5 pages double spaced, with 12 point font.

For This or a Similar Paper Click Here To Order Now

First Paper – 1200 words or about 4-5 pages double spaced, with 12 point font.
So far, the quizzes and discussions in this course concern how well you are understanding the thought of folks such as Medieval to Modern Europe (Chapter 16) through Kierkegaard and Marx (Chapter 22). A paper will allow you to say where you now stand, after considering what they have had to say.
Such a paper will not require further reading or library research—though that is not ruled out. What it does demand is some serious thinking—thinking that demonstrates you have grappled with an issue of importance in the light of the best that has been written about it in the history of the West.
There are two broad topics on which you can write:
The best life for a human being to live, -or-
The best overall picture of reality
Think of the above as two possible thesis statements that you can choose from that relate to an author/argument from the readings that we’ve done so far, in The Great Conversation book that we use for this class. Your paper’s thesis statement will say something like this, “I argue that the best life for a human being is better than philosopher X’s position” or “I argue that the best overall picture of reality is better than philosopher X’s view”. *Keep in mind, you must choose a philosopher from our classroom text and not any other philosopher who is not mentioned in our classroom text. More specifically, you must choose one philosopher from Chapters 16-22 to write your paper on.
With respect to one of these topics,
Introduction paragraph/thesis statement – choose a view expressed by one of our philosophers with whom you disagree from The Great Conversation Book we use for this class.
Body – describe that view accurately; present the philosopher’s argument/main position clearly; here I’ll expect you to quote them, with page number at least 2-3 times, but no more than 3. ex. ” Hume states that….” (Melchert, pages 35-36). This is how I want your quotes to be formatted in.
Also, and very important here: you must quote the actual book we are using in this class for this paper. If you do not have at least 2-3 quotes from our book, you will lose points. In other words, I do not want you to cut and paste quotes from the internet into your paper.
You may use “additional” quotes outside of this text to compliment the 2-3 quotes that need to come from our classroom text.
Counter argument – construct an alternative that you think is better, and present reasons (an argument, a logos) that you believe shows the alternative is better. This will be reflective of your own thoughts.
Bibliography – create a bibliography for this book and article that you’re referring to.
In constructing your alternative and arguing for it, you may make use of any thoughts and arguments we have canvassed this term—provided you acknowledge their source. But this is not to be a report of how “Kant thinks about Hume” or “Exactly how the philosophy of Rationalism might have differed from Empiricism” or even how Kant might have differed from the teachings of the Hobbes”. The aim of the paper is for you to speak for yourself.
Such a paper, then, will express your views, as they have come to be formulated under the pressure of “conversations” with the Sophists, Socrates, the skeptics, and so on. But a good paper will also display (1) an accurate and subtle understanding of philosophical issues and (2) skill in argumentation. So this will not be merely a “subjective opinion paper.” Papers will be graded not on conclusions drawn, but on the adequacy of the understanding displayed and the quality of the arguments put forward.
I will grade you based upon my grading rubric, so please get familiar with this ahead of time; also, and this is very important, I will accept papers early but not late.
This is not an easy assignment. A good paper will require much thought. Don’t leave it until the last minute.
Introduction Paragraph and Thesis Statement (1 paragraph).
view longer description
10 to >7.5 pts
Excellent
The paper includes a clear statement of purpose in the introduction paragraph. It is clear to me what the author is going to argue for.
/ 10 pts
Body – Argument against another philosopher
view longer description
35 to >26.25 pts
Excellent
The paper’s main argument builds on the strongest arguments found in the assigned readings for the philosopher in question.
26.25 to >17.5 pts
Good
The main argument builds on one or more of the arguments found in the assigned readings but fails to discuss other relevant arguments found there related to the specific philosopher.
17.5 to >8.75 pts
Needs Improvement
The main argument refers to the assigned readings but does not correctly identify and build on the strongest arguments found there from the philosopher.
8.75 to >0 pts
Missing or Unacceptable
The main argument shows little or no familiarity with the arguments found in the assigned readings based upon the specific philosopher in question.
/ 35 pts
Counter argument
view longer description
30 to >22.5 pts
Excellent
The objection to the paper’s thesis builds on the strongest arguments against the particular philosopher that you’re arguing against.
22.5 to >15 pts
Good
The objection builds on one or more of the arguments found in the assigned readings but fails to discuss other relevant arguments found there against the specific philosopher you’re arguing against.
15 to >7.5 pts
Needs Improvement
The objection refers to the assigned readings but does not correctly identify and build on the strongest arguments found there based upon the specific philosopher you’re arguing against.
7.5 to >0 pts
Missing or Unacceptable
The objection shows little or no familiarity with the arguments found in the assigned readings or that there is no objection at all to the specific philosopher you’re arguing against.
/ 30 pts
Support and Documentation
view longer description
10 pts
Excellent
All major claims about arguments found in the assigned readings are supported by a properly documented quotation or paraphrase. The paper includes a Bibliography or Works Cited.
7 pts
Good
Some major claims about arguments found in the assigned readings are properly supported, while others are not. The paper includes a Works Cited page.
4 pts
Needs Improvement
The paper refers to the assigned readings, but few major claims about the arguments found there are properly supported. The paper includes a Works Cited page.
0 pts
Missing or Unacceptable
The paper includes very few properly supported claims—or none at all— and/or lacks a Works Cited page.
/ 10 pts
Grammar
view longer description
15 pts
Excellent
Your paper is very easy to read, as you have only minimal to no errors at all with your grammar.
9 pts
Good
Your paper is easy to read, but there are a few areas where your grammar could be a little better.
6 pts
Needs Improvement
Your paper is more difficult to read, as you have areas where your grammar needs to be improved because it’s difficult for me to understand exactly what you mean. The writing center might be a good idea for you as they can help you to get stronger in your writing skills.
0 pts
Missing or Uncceptable
Your paper is difficult to read, as you have areas where your grammar needs to be improved because it’s difficult for me to understand exactly what you mean. I”m recommending that you take this to the writing center as they can help you.

For This or a Similar Paper Click Here To Order Now