Evelyn Ortega from Guatemala In a 3-page essay, analyze violence, obsession, and

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Evelyn Ortega from Guatemala
In a 3-page essay, analyze violence, obsession, and power through the lens of Guatemala, regarding immigration, migrations, trauma, current border realities and criminality in general. How have these elements been reflected in Isabel Allende’s novel, as well as potentially, in the development of her character, Evelyn and her struggles.
Here is a repetition of some information about Evelyn.
Evelyn is from Guatemala She is a nanny who has been involved in an accident with Richard at the beginning of the story. Now she is circumstantially involved in a murder although she is innocent. Being in the United States illegally is frightening which only complicates this mysterious accidental situation even more. Because of her country’s socio-political violence, she had been smuggled to the US. Now, as an undocumented migrant and worker, she panics thinking about the consequences of a possible discovery regarding this unlawful, border crossing and entry.
Now, here are some more aspects relating to her native land. Guatemala is a country in Central America which many people unfortunately only align with tourism and/or terrorism. Although it is true that tourists come to visit Mayan ruins, colonial structures, picturesque towns with exquisite handicrafts, mountains, lakes, rainforests, and cautiously friendly people, there is much more to this country. Perhaps, caution, though, is a place to start. The caution exhibited by the citizenry may be attributed to the violence and massacres often perpetrated upon the populace by a variety of different actors, both legal and illegal. Although conflict, racism, historical occurrences, and the Guatemalan culture itself have contributed to this grave situation, this nation state still has many other dimensions. Some of the most predominant ones, however, relate to the strength and fortitude of the Guatemalan people.
Greg Campbell is an author of one chapter in The Guatemala Reader, entitled “Death by Deportation”. In that chapter he stated that “for many young people, the dream of a better Guatemala has been replaced by the struggle to get out of Guatemala…Most who come to the U.S. are looking for jobs, but some have arrived fleeing gangs called “maras”. These gangs threaten them with death for refusing to join [the group] or trying to leave it.”
Some points to consider in this second option.
Although the characters seem so different, they share a unifying characteristic- struggle. Whether past or present, this concept is a constant in Allende’s work. It is a force to be contended with across different dimensions: personal, social, or political. It may seemingly invade place and space with a menacing ease of motion and threaten anyone in its way or it may become dormant. Nevertheless, as the text demonstrates, one of the most crucial parts associated with this word is when it collides with a person, place, or thing. The result of this collision will always be noticeably great, and completely inescapable. It is also what the criminals play on and with to collect more victims and profit from them.
Inexplicably, this same event happens at the beginning of the book. Richard and Evelyn have a car accident. Yet this happening escalates from being an unfortunate daily occurrence in the world of traffic to an involvement of a human rights scholar in the shadowy grip of murder. Apparently, there is a body in the trunk of this car. Yet, this murder is more than just a crime waiting for solution and a corpse awaiting burial. It is the end of a person’s life; an individual with a story, face, and history. This narrative device can be applied to a multitude of other people and places: migrants, coyotes, government officials, conflicts, borders, the disappeared, caravans, gang members, police enforcement, vehicles of transportation, and small and large cities and towns worldwide. Struggle, in the midst of winter or in any other season, seems incapable of being stopped. One can only wonder how global criminality’s strategies, ideological structures and systems of power have made things more difficult for those involved in this area and if Central America’s hopes, struggles, and dreams will ever be able to be completely manifested even with the help of human rights initiatives and legal experts. How have criminals used all this to their advantage?

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