After reading chapters 1 and 2 in Messages from Frank’s Landing by Charles Wilki

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After reading chapters 1 and 2 in Messages from Frank’s Landing by Charles Wilkinson and selections from Indians of the Pacific Northwest by Vine Deloria, write a well-organized, thesis-driven essay that answers the following: How did the Southern Coast Salish Tribes and American settlers perceive each other in the 19th century, and how did these perceptions impact their relationship? Although prompt is broad, your response should be specific and focus on a specific aspect of the issue; also, you are not required to use all of the readings to form your response. Provide specific examples from the assigned readings and discuss those examples in relation to arguable claims. Use summary, paraphrase and direct quotation to present your evidence. (Times new roman, size 12 font, double spaced)
Introduction: One way to think of introductions and conclusions are as entry and exit points for your reader. Imagine that your reader has entered into a room where you are speaking—they are intelligent and curious and are willing to listen to you if you (1) engage their attention, (2) present yourself as an authority on the subject and (3) make clear why they should listen to you in the first place. With that in mind, introductory paragraphs typically contain the following elements:
– A hook – a short anecdote that catches your reader’s attention
– Background information: historical context that prepares your reader for your thesis (this is where your previously written summaries may be useful)
– Mention of key authors/texts: this helps your audience situate your essay in a broader dialogue, and also helps establish you as a credible speaker.
– Thesis
Thesis (main claim): A thesis establishes your purpose: it preempts your audience’s question: “Why am I reading this essay in the first place?” A thesis must be argumentative, which is to say it should be a declarative statement that opens up a space for argument, and gives insight into the claims that will follow.
Supporting Claims: Like your thesis, supporting claims should be declarative statements. They should support a specific aspect of your thesis. Claims should be placed at the very beginning of a body section/paragraph.
Evidence: All evidence that you provide and discuss should be sourced from our texts (Wilkinson, Deloria and the “Southern Coast Salish” article). You should primarily rely on paraphrase to present evidence, and to a lesser degree on direct quotation. Remember to provide in-text citations after the first sentence of a paraphrase, and at the end of ANY sentence that contains direct quotation.
Conclusion: As your introduction guides your audience into your conversation, a conclusion should mindfully guide your audience out of your conversation. For this reason, these are some things you might write about in your conclusion (there are no rules here, other than what feels intuitive to you):
– Summarize your argument
– Call attention to the most important parts of your essay
– Suggest how the audience should bring what they read in your essay out into their lived experience
– Identify questions for future inquiry

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